Can you fool the ultrasonic sensor on Samsung Galaxy S10 with a fake finger impression?

Can you fool the ultrasonic sensor on Samsung Galaxy S10 with a fake finger impression?



Despite the claims, the ‘ultrasonic’ fingerprint reader on Samsung Galaxy S10 can be easily unlocked using a 3D-model fingerprint – giving hackers easy access to the device. 

The exploit was initially discovered by a Reddit user with the username of ‘darkshark9’ who claims to clone his own fingerprint from a photograph of the print left on a wine glass with the help of Adobe Photoshop, Autodesk 3ds Max and a home 3D printer. 

As proof, he uploaded his finding on Imgur, where he showed the device being unlocked with the fake print – the same way his actual finger does. 

In his post, he explained that if he steals someone’s phone, their fingerprints are likely to be already on the device. The same process of using a 3D printer can be applied to open the smartphone within minutes. 

"It took me 3 reprints trying to get the right ridge height (and I forgot to mirror the fingerprint on the first one) but yeah, 3rd time was the charm. The 3D print will unlock my phone...in some cases just as well as my actual finger does." explained Darkshark. Adding further, "Most banking apps only require fingerprint authentication so I could have all of your info and spend your money in less than 15 minutes if your phone is secured by fingerprint alone."
He also claimed that the same method could be applied to other devices using a high-quality DSLR camera. 

The fingerprint reader on the Galaxy S10 was the primary feature of the device with Samsung claiming their biometric security system to be providing a high level of protection. On the other hand, security experts have always been opposed to biometric security and commented that they are less secure than password and PIN code. 

In fact, multiple tests have also revealed that the facial recognition technology used on many smartphones is not foolproof as well and even Samsung agrees with the findings.


Featured photo: Sarah Tew/CNET

Source of the post : https://www.digitalinformationworld.com 

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